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  • Writer's picturePeter Thomson

Are Fog and Edge Computing the same? And what's behind the name?

Fog computing, also known as edge computing, can help companies save money in a few ways:

  1. Reduced Data Transfer Costs: With edge computing, data processing and analysis happens locally on the edge device, reducing the amount of data that needs to be transferred to a central data center or cloud. This can help companies save money on data transfer costs, which can be significant for companies with large amounts of data.

  2. Lower Bandwidth Costs: Edge computing can also help companies save money on bandwidth costs. By processing data locally, edge computing reduces the amount of data that needs to be transmitted over the network, which can help reduce the bandwidth requirements and costs.

  3. Lower Cloud Computing Costs: Edge computing can also help reduce cloud computing costs. By processing data on the edge device, companies can reduce the amount of data that needs to be processed in the cloud, leading to lower cloud computing costs.

  4. Faster Processing Times: With edge computing, data processing happens locally on the edge device, which can help reduce processing times and improve the overall efficiency of the system. This can lead to improved productivity and reduced operational costs.

Overall, near edge computing can help companies save money on data transfer costs, bandwidth costs, cloud computing costs, and can improve system efficiency, leading to improved productivity and reduced operational costs.


Fog computing is a distributed computing architecture that brings computing and storage resources closer to the edge of the network, typically within the same physical location as the devices generating and consuming the data. Fog computing is designed to address the limitations of cloud computing in handling the massive amounts of data generated by the Internet of Things (IoT) devices and other edge devices.


The term "fog" comes from the idea of cloud computing being high up in the sky and fog computing being closer to the ground. In fog computing, devices and resources are located at the edge of the network, typically in the same physical location as the devices generating and consuming the data. This allows for faster processing and response times, reduced network congestion, and improved data security and privacy.


Fog computing can be used for a variety of applications, such as industrial automation, smart grid management, smart transportation, and healthcare. By bringing computing resources closer to the edge of the network, fog computing can help improve the efficiency, reliability, and security of these systems.


Overall, fog computing is a distributed computing architecture that brings computing and storage resources closer to the edge of the network, improving the efficiency, reliability, and security of IoT and other edge devices.


Fog computing doesn't necessarily "fix" the cloud computing market, but rather complements it by addressing some of the limitations of cloud computing, particularly in handling the massive amounts of data generated by IoT and other edge devices.


Cloud computing is designed to provide centralized computing and storage resources that can be accessed over the internet, which is ideal for applications that require massive amounts of computing power, such as big data analytics, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. However, cloud computing can also have limitations when it comes to processing and analyzing data generated by IoT and other edge devices.


This is where fog computing comes in. By bringing computing and storage resources closer to the edge of the network, fog computing can help reduce latency, improve network efficiency, and enhance data security and privacy. This can help overcome some of the limitations of cloud computing, particularly when it comes to handling large amounts of data generated by IoT and other edge devices.


Fog computing can also provide additional benefits, such as local decision-making, real-time processing, and improved reliability and availability of IoT and other edge devices. By combining the capabilities of cloud computing and fog computing, companies can create a powerful and scalable distributed computing infrastructure that can meet the demands of a wide range of applications and use cases.


Fog computing can benefit a variety of industries, particularly those that rely on IoT and other edge devices for data collection and processing. Here are some examples of industries that can benefit from fog computing:

  1. Manufacturing: In the manufacturing industry, fog computing can help improve efficiency, reduce downtime, and optimize production processes by providing real-time analytics and decision-making capabilities. For example, by placing fog computing devices on the factory floor, manufacturers can collect and analyze data from sensors, machines, and other edge devices, and use this data to improve quality control, predictive maintenance, and other manufacturing processes.

  2. Transportation: In the transportation industry, fog computing can help improve safety, efficiency, and sustainability by providing real-time data analytics and decision-making capabilities. For example, by placing fog computing devices on vehicles or at transportation hubs, companies can collect and analyze data from sensors, cameras, and other edge devices, and use this data to optimize traffic flow, reduce emissions, and improve driver safety.

  3. Healthcare: In the healthcare industry, fog computing can help improve patient outcomes, reduce costs, and enhance data security and privacy. For example, by placing fog computing devices in hospitals or other healthcare facilities, healthcare providers can collect and analyze data from medical devices, wearables, and other edge devices, and use this data to improve diagnosis, treatment, and patient monitoring.

  4. Energy: In the energy industry, fog computing can help improve efficiency, reduce costs, and enhance reliability and sustainability. For example, by placing fog computing devices on power grids or at energy production facilities, companies can collect and analyze data from sensors, meters, and other edge devices, and use this data to optimize energy consumption, reduce waste, and improve grid stability.

Overall, fog computing can benefit a wide range of industries by providing real-time data analytics, decision-making capabilities, and improved security and privacy for IoT and other edge devices.


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